Erin Cluley: 3 Solo Exhibitions Opening this Weekend

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CLULEY PROJECTS

2123 SYLVAN AVE, DALLAS


JOHN MIRANDA
MOVIDAS: NEW WORK

MAY 21 – JUNE 26, 2021
OPENING RECEPTION: FRIDAY, MAY 21 5-8 PM
CLULEY PROJECTS
2123 SYLVAN AVE, DALLAS 

Email for a list of available works >>>

In JOHN MIRANDA’s exhibition MOVIDAS: NEW WORK, symbols are used to explore cultural identity and memory by recreating found objects from the artist’s childhood. He describes his work as a “mapping” of environments based on his Mexican American heritage by presenting the desert landscape of Del Rio, Texas where he spent his childhood with a sharp contrast to his life in the metropolis of Dallas as a young adult.

Miranda’s work invokes a Chicano sensibility and an attitude of Rasquachismo– an underdog perspective rooted in resourcefulness and adaptability, yet mindful of stance and style. He is influenced by paño art and Lowrider Arte, Latinx styles that consists of equally spaced, never overlapping images to give each image the same level of importance. He uses encaustic as a material because he relates its resilience to life by saying “even if you break it, it can still come back together.”

MOVIDAS: NEW WORK will feature new paintings, encaustic on paper works, and sculpture.

Zeke Williams, Panorama Trailhead, Kodachrome Basin, 2021, oil on CNC carved Russian birch plywood, red oak frame, 36 inch diameter.

ERIN CLULEY GALLERY

150 MANUFACTURING STREET, STE. 210, DALLAS


ZEKE WILLIAMS
OVER AND BACK

MAY 22 – JUNE 26, 2021
OPENING RECEPTION: SATURDAY, MAY 22 5-8 PM
ERIN CLULEY GALLERY
150 MANUFACTURING STREET, STE 210, DALLAS

Email for a list of available works >>>

In his fourth solo exhibition with the gallery, ZEKE WILLIAMS creates montages of dazzling pattern, shape, and color. Beginning as outlined compositions making reference to landscape imagery of National Parks, the works on wood are imbued with the artist’s customized patterns reminiscent of quilting designs. Evolving from previous works executed as digital paintings printed onto canvas, the works featured in OVER AND BACK find themselves being made with the same set of digital tools but with the return of the artist’s hand.

Williams’ new works are created by laser-cutting and engraving wood pieces and hand painting them with an array of colors – some areas even chose to be left bare to reveal the natural properties of the wood. The pieces are then assembled together like a puzzle, emphasizing Williams’ love for games and playful qualities in art making. The discovery of working with engraved wood in the studio came about when Williams was printmaking with a woodblock and came to realize that the wooden plate was more enticing than the print itself.

Although much of his work leans into the abstract realm, OVER AND BACK focuses on Williams’ recent venture into landscapes. The images are sourced from photographs taken by his grandparents while on trips to National Parks such as Yellowstone and Zion during the artist’s youth.
 

Hidenori Ishii, FTM (40.717469, -73.951243) – Green Bill Board, 2020, screenprint on fiber paper mounted on panel, collected acrylic sheet and cast urethane, 17 x 17 inches.

ERIN CLULEY GALLERY

150 MANUFACTURING STREET, STE. 210, DALLAS


HIDENORI ISHII
UNDER CONSTRUCTION

MAY 22 – JUNE 26, 2021
OPENING RECEPTION: SATURDAY, MAY 22 5-8 PM
ERIN CLULEY GALLERY
150 MANUFACTURING STREET, STE 210, DALLAS

Email for a list of available works >>>

HIDENORI ISHII’s exhibition UNDER CONSTRUCTION was created during his yearlong keyholder residency at LES (Lower East Side) Printshop in New York City. The works are made from the square plexiglass windows installed on the city’s pervasive green construction barrier walls and are a collaboration with unknown graffiti artists of the area. The series raises questions about the social and economic impact of wealth inequality, gentrification, and the global pandemic.

The process begins by Ishii creating screen printed imagery as “tagging” on his own plexiglass window and switching it out with one installed on the street that is already graffitied. The marked windows are then fitted with a backing of screen printed fiber paper mounted on green panel. The prints are composed of enlarged images of American bills of currency – cropped and placed intentionally to interact with the graffiti marks on the surface. The works act as direct responses to events happening at the time of their creation.

The collaborative series began during the pandemic while much of New York City was still shut down. Ishii saw this as an opportunity to view and display art at a time when this concept felt impossible. The artist’s exchanging of the windows brings to mind the exchanging of money and the green walls dividing two different social groups are seen as symbols of the city’s changing landscape – with the graffiti acting as a direct response to this change from its citizens.

The juxtaposition of the layered processes with the works visualizes the skewed imbalance of our economy as Ishii compares the currency to art – both an abstract concept, illusionistic, and yet fundamental to our modern life.