Tag Archive: South Dallas Cultural Center

SEPIA Exhibition: A Legacy in Photography

“Sepia magazine began in Fort Worth, Texas in 1947 as Negro Achievements, a magazine highlighting African American success articles and featuring reader-submitted true confessions stories. In 1951, two years after the death of its black founder, Horace J. Blackwell, Sepia found new leadership in white business mogul, George Levitan. With Levitan’s guidance, the magazine became the longest standing competitor to the more successful African American magazine, Ebony.”

– Mia L Anderson, Ph.D. Seeking a Place in the Sun, Sepia Magazine’s Endeavor for Quality Journalism and Place in the Negro Market, 1951-1982


Sept. 25 – Oct. 27, 2017

South Dallas Cultural Center, 3400 S. Fitzhugh, Dallas TX  sdcc.dallasculture.org/


Horace J. Blackwell, a black entrepreneur, set out to create a publication company that produced a true confessions tabloid magazine for African Americans. His first endeavor was The World’s Messenger in 1942 and was one of only two publications distributed regionally for African Americans. Blackwell’s success with The World’s Messenger, led to his 1946 production of Negro Achievements. John H. Johnson’s new publication, Ebonymagazine in 1945, was also influential in Blackwell’s creation of the additional magazine. This new publication would provide an alternative for Blackwell’s regional audience. Blackwell died in 1949 of a stroke, but left intact a publication company that changed ownership to a new leader.

In 1951, George Levitan purchased Negro Achievements and changed the name of the magazine to Sepia. The publication focused primarily on various aspects of African American culture, including religion, civil rights, education, entertainment, and politics. With the objective of fostering leadership, the magazine also published articles on the development of Black institutions, including colleges and universities.

Sepia had a circulation of approximately 160,000 in 1982, which was its final year of publication. Beatrice Pringle one of the first African American women publishers was its last publisher and left the magazine 1981. The Sepia Photographic Archive is one of the most valuable resources of African American achievement in the world, and is an immense catalogue of American culture and history. The archive contains over 10,000 photographs, and is one of the most important collections of historical photography ever amassed. The Sepia Photographic Archive is the property of the African American Museum in Dallas, TX.

Permanent link to this article: http://artgroupsdfw.com/exhibits-events/sepia-exhibition-a-legacy-in-photography/

One Step Ahead Artist Talk June 17 at SDCC

onestepaheadJune17

“One Step Ahead”

Artist Talk
Sat. June 17, 2017 3:00pm – 5:00pm

One Step Ahead is a joint exhibition by Lyndon Barrois Jr. and Kahlil Robert Irving, that excavates a pivotal period of American culture and politics, examining loss as a stifling of progress. Reflecting on the affects of the assassinations of Civil Rights leaders Malcolm X and Martin Luther King Jr., Barrois Jr. and Irving mine cultural iconography, both celestial and terrestrial, presenting metaphorical and juxtapositional gestures that bring historic concerns into our present condition. Through both traditional and inventive strategies of making, One Step Ahead draws from the eponymous 1967 song by Aretha Franklin, which touches on time and the inevitability of heartbreak where love is concerned. In acknowledging two lives, two assassinations, and two directions of thought towards the progress of Black life in the United States, the artist hope to prompt past, present, and future reflections on mortality, while working to translate their perspectives into alternate ways of understanding identity and protest.

About the Artists:

Lyndon Barrois Jr. has exhibited nationally, including solo exhibitions at the Contemporary Art Museum St. Louis, the University of Illinois Springfield Visual Arts Gallery, Fort Gondo Compound for the Arts (St. Louis), and group exhibitions at La Esquina (Kansas City), the Chicago Artist Coalition (Chicago) and Blackburn 20/20 Gallery (New York), to name a few. He received an MFA from the Sam Fox School of Design & Visual Art at Washington University in St. Louis. He has held residencies at Atlantic Center for the Arts, Arteles Creative Center in Finland, and Nes Artist Residency in Iceland. Barrois Jr. was a teaching artist at the Stony Island Arts Bank in Chicago and a faculty member at Washington University and Webster University. He is currently the Museum Educator at Contemporary Art Museum St. Louis.

Kahlil Robert Irving is a multimedia artist living and working in Saint Louis, Missouri. He recently completed his undergraduate degree at the Kansas City Art Institute, double majoring in Art History and Ceramics. Currently he is pursuing a Master of Fine Arts at Washington University in St. Louis. At Washington University, Irving is a Chancellor’s Graduate Fellow. His work in the collections of the Riga Porcelain Museum, in Riga, Latvia; Foundation for Contemporary Ceramic Art in Kecskemet, Hungary, and the Ken Ferguson Teaching Collection at the Kansas City Art Institute in Kansas City, Missouri. His work has also been exhibited at the Vox Populi Gallery, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; Kansas City Artist Coalition, Kansas City, Missouri; Glassell School and Museum of fine art, Houston, Texas; and the Visual Arts Center, Boise State University, Boise, Idaho.

The South Dallas Cultural Center has a new website!
sdcc.dallasculture.org

 

Permanent link to this article: http://artgroupsdfw.com/exhibits-events/one-step-ahead-artist-talk-june-17-at-sdcc/

May is Black Men’s Month at SDCC! One Step Ahead Reception May 12 & Black Men’s Film Festival May 19 & 20

SDCCMay2017

One Step Ahead

Opening Reception
Friday, May 12, 2017 6:00pm – 8:00pm
Artist Talk
Sat. June 17, 2017 3:00pm – 5:00pm

One Step Ahead is a joint exhibition by Lyndon Barrois Jr. and Kahlil Robert Irving, that excavates a pivotal period of American culture and politics, examining loss as a stifling of progress. Reflecting on the affects of the assassinations of Civil Rights leaders Malcolm X and Martin Luther King Jr., Barrois Jr. and Irving mine cultural iconography, both celestial and terrestrial, presenting metaphorical and juxtapositional gestures that bring historic concerns into our present condition. Through both traditional and inventive strategies of making, One Step Ahead draws from the eponymous 1967 song by Aretha Franklin, which touches on time and the inevitability of heartbreak where love is concerned. In acknowledging two lives, two assassinations, and two directions of thought towards the progress of Black life in the United States, the artist hope to prompt past, present, and future reflections on mortality, while working to translate their perspectives into alternate ways of understanding identity and protest.

OneStepAhead

About the Artists:

Lyndon Barrois Jr. has exhibited nationally, including solo exhibitions at the Contemporary Art Museum St. Louis, the University of Illinois Springfield Visual Arts Gallery, Fort Gondo Compound for the Arts (St. Louis), and group exhibitions at La Esquina (Kansas City), the Chicago Artist Coalition (Chicago) and Blackburn 20/20 Gallery (New York), to name a few. He received an MFA from the Sam Fox School of Design & Visual Art at Washington University in St. Louis. He has held residencies at Atlantic Center for the Arts, Arteles Creative Center in Finland, and Nes Artist Residency in Iceland. Barrois Jr. was a teaching artist at the Stony Island Arts Bank in Chicago and a faculty member at Washington University and Webster University. He is currently the Museum Educator at Contemporary Art Museum St. Louis.

Kahlil Robert Irving is a multimedia artist living and working in Saint Louis, Missouri. He recently completed his undergraduate degree at the Kansas City Art Institute, double majoring in Art History and Ceramics. Currently he is pursuing a Master of Fine Arts at Washington University in St. Louis. At Washington University, Irving is a Chancellor’s Graduate Fellow. His work in the collections of the Riga Porcelain Museum, in Riga, Latvia; Foundation for Contemporary Ceramic Art in Kecskemet, Hungary, and the Ken Ferguson Teaching Collection at the Kansas City Art Institute in Kansas City, Missouri. His work has also been exhibited at the Vox Populi Gallery, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; Kansas City Artist Coalition, Kansas City, Missouri; Glassell School and Museum of fine art, Houston, Texas; and the Visual Arts Center, Boise State University, Boise, Idaho.


 

BlackMen'sfilmfestival

Black Men’s Film Festival

Friday, May 19, 2017 8:00pm
Free

Seven Songs for Malcolm X
Produced by the Black Audio Film Collective
A Film by John Akomfrah

An homage to the inspirational African-American civil rights leader, SEVEN SONGS FOR MALCOLM X collects testimonies, eyewitness accounts and dramatic reenactments to tell the life, legacy, loves, and losses of Malcolm X.

Featuring interviews with Malcolm’s widow Betty Shabazz, Spike Lee, and many other, SEVEN SONGS looks for the meaning behind the resurgence of interest in the man whose X always stood for the unknown.

“What makes Seven Songs so provocative is that Akomfrah shows respect for many different interpretations of Malcolm, suggesting that this revolutionary figure belongs to everybody.” —The Chicago Reader

Check out the film trailer here!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4zYQ3W-IKSI
Sat., May 20, 2017 8:00pm
Free

James Baldwin: The Price of the Ticket
Producer/Director: Karen Thorsen, Producers: William Miles and Douglas K. Dempsey

The life, works and beliefs of the late writer and civil rights activist are recounted: what it is to be born black, impoverished, gifted, and gay in a world that has yet to understand that “all men are brothers.” James Baldwin tells his own story in this emotional portrait. Using rarely-seen archival footage from nine different countries, the film melds intimate interviews and eloquent public speeches with cinéma vérité glimpses of Baldwin and original scenes from his extraordinary funeral service in December 1987. His close friends and colleagues — even critics — illuminate the narrative, among them writers Maya Angelou, Amiri Baraka and William Styron, plus entertainer Bobby Short. James Baldwin: The Price of the Ticket was originally broadcast August 14, 1989 on AMERICAN MASTERS

Check out the film trailer here!
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4_hYraYI2J8

 


The South Dallas Cultural Center has a new website!

sdcc.dallasculture.org

Programs at the South Dallas Cultural Center are supported in part by the City of Dallas Office of Cultural Affairs, the Texas Commission on the Arts and the National Endowment for the Arts.

Permanent link to this article: http://artgroupsdfw.com/exhibits-events/may-is-black-mens-month-at-sdcc-one-step-ahead-reception-may-12-black-mens-film-festival-may-19-20/

blkART214 and Talking Sticks open April 6 at the SDCC

blkart214

blkart214 april6

blkART214
Opening Reception and Juror Talk
Thursday, April 6, 2017
6:00-8:00 pm

blkART214 is an annual juried exhibition designed to showcase the recent work of professional and emerging artists of African descent who reside and are active in the artistic environment of the Dallas area. In honor of the 30th Anniversary of the South Dallas Cultural Center, this year’s theme is Memory, Movements and the Present Moment.

blkART214 is a component of ART 214, a collaboration between the City of Dallas’ Office of Cultural Affairs cultural centers and facilities in celebration of Dallas Arts Month 2017.

Artists include:
Sanah Brown,
Spencer Evans
Rocynda Kedley
Fela Ramond
Jamal Dubose
Jazzmine Bustamonte
Johnathan Victor
Kimbra Young
Roneka Patterson
Tiffany Anderson
Jas Mardis

Juror:
Annette Lawrence
Annette Lawrence is a Professor of Studio Art at the University of North Texas, College of Visual Arts and Design. She received a MFA from The Maryland Institute College of Art, Hoffberger School of Painting, and a BFA in Sculpture from The Hartford Art School, University of Hartford.

Talking Sticks
Opening Reception and Artist Talk
Thursday, April 6, 2017
6:00-8:00 pm

Talking Sticks is a new installation by Dallas Folk Artists Billy Edmond. In Talking Sticks, Emonds uses carved wood walking canes to create social commentary about Black identity.


 

DallasArtsMonth

South Dallas Cultural Center
3400 S. Fitzhugh
Dallas, TX 75210
214.939.2782  http://www.dallasculture.org/SDCulturalCenter

Permanent link to this article: http://artgroupsdfw.com/uncategorized/blkart214-and-talking-sticks-open-april-6-at-the-sdcc/

Black Women’s Month @ SDCC (African Diaspora, Exhibits & Film Festival)

SDCClog30th

March is Black Women’s Month
at the South Dallas Cultural Center
http://www.dallasculture.org/SDCulturalCenter/
3400 South Fitzhugh
Dallas TX 75210
Phone: 214.939.2787
African Diaspora: New Dialogues
Sanderia Faye in Coversation with Kiese Laymon

Thursday, March 2, 2017
7:30 pm
FreeWordSpace and the South Dallas Cultural Center present the third season of African Diaspora: New Dialogues, a series of free readings and discussions dedicated to bringing Dallas audiences major contributors to the literary life of the African Diaspora.Kiese Laymon is a black southern writer, born and raised in Jackson, Mississippi. Laymon attended Millsaps College and Jackson State University before graduating from Oberlin College. He earned an MFA in Fiction from Indiana University and is currently a Professor of English and African American Studies at the University of Mississippi. Laymon is the author of the novel, Long Division and a collection of essays, How to Slowly Kill Yourself and Others in America, the UK edition released in 2016.This event will be hosted by Dallas novelist Sanderia Faye, whose novelMourner’s Bench won the 2016 Hurston/Wright Foundation Award for debut fiction.

invisible. &
Safe House

Special Black Women’s Month Gallery Exhibitions

Open Reception
Friday, March 3, 2017
6:00-8:00 pm

invisible. is a collection of new work by Ciara Elle Bryant that uses the black female body as a site to explore black female identity in popular culture. Invisible. uses mixed media to explore the themes of power, femininity and social objectivity.

Born in Miami Florida, Bryant is a fine art photographer residing in Dallas, Texas where she recently received her Bachelor’s degree in Arts and Performance with a concentration in Visual Arts from The University of Texas at Dallas.

Safe House is an exhibit on the African American coding tradition in quilts and the bond of black women in quilting circles. The quilts feature traditional block-quilting, original designs, and fiber art, quilted by hand as well as by machine. Creativity and improvisation are common characteristics of many African American quilts and theses quilts provide us with insight into a rich heritage and history. Quilts featured in the exhibit come from members of the Quilting Sister of Color Quilting Circle.

Friday, March 10, 2017 | 7:00pm – Black Box Theater
$10.00 General Admission
$5.00 Students/Seniors
Purchase Tickets Here!

Daughters of the Dust: written and directed Juile Dash – At the dawn of the 20th century, a family in the Gullah community of coastal South Carolina — former West African slaves who adopted many of their ancestors’ Yoruba traditions — suffers a generational split. Talkback led by Angela Ards, Associate Professor of English at Southern Methodist University.

Saturday, March 11, 2017 | 7:00pm– Black Box Theater
$10.00 General Admission
$5.00 Students/Seniors
Purchase Tickets Here!

Free Angela and All Political Prisoners: written and directed Shola Lynch- Free Angela is a gripping historic account of the events that catapulted a young University of California philosophy professor into a controversial political icon in the turbulent late 1960’s. Talkback lead by Dr. Latrese Adkins Weathersby – Beloved Community Consulting Group.

The Chanelle Pearson Suite – an evening of short films featuring the work of Chanelle Aponte Pearson.

Friday & SaturdayMarch 10-11, 2017 | 7:30pm– Studio Theater
$10.00 General Admission
$5.00 Students/Seniors

Purchase Tickets Here!

 

So Young So Pretty So White, produced & co-directed by Chanelle Pearson, is a segment from a feature-length documentary that is currently in development the addresses the global practice of skin bleaching.

Chef Gaby: decolonizing the kitchen, produced and directed by Chanelle Person, is a short documentary about Gabriela Alvarez, a chef, healer, and activist living and working in Brooklyn.

Worry No. 473 of 1000 Worries that a Black Person Should Not Have to Worry About, produced by Chanelle Pearson is a short film made in collaboration with Blackout for Human Rights.

Something to Believe, produced by Chanelle Pearson, is a film that addresses the detachment we all battle, when faced with the world’s overwhelming issues.

Frenel, produced by Chanelle Pearson, highlights the life and work of a Brooklyn-based milliner.

195 Lewis pilot episode, written, produced and directed by Chanelle Pearson, is your introduction to a group of friends navigating the realities of being Black, queer, and polyamorous in Brooklyn, New York.

Ryann Holmes: the work is waking up, produced and directed by Chanelle Pearson, is a short documentary about Ryann Holmes, a community organizer and co-founder of bklyn boihood, a collective of Black and Brown women and transmen working towards reframing and redefining masculinity.

*Chanelle Person and Ryann Holmes will be in attendance

Permanent link to this article: http://artgroupsdfw.com/exhibits-events/black-womens-month-sdcc-african-diaspora-exhibits-film-festival/

AfroFuturism at the SDCC

KaraWalker Texas Ranger

IN THE GALLERY

“KaraWalkerTexasRanger” by Christopher Blay.

SDCC MeetUps!- AfroFuturism
For the closing……


Calling all Black Sci Fi, Speculative Fiction and Afro Futurism enthusiasts. Join us for a very special SDCC MeetUp! to coincide with the KWTXR exhibition. We will screen “Black Sci-Fi” which was produced and directed by Terrence Francis. Black Sci-Fi talk back will be led by Eric Reece. Artist Christopher Blay will be on hand talking about the themes an inspiration in KWTXR. Oh, did we mention the AfroFuturism jam session!
Saturday, Aug. 20, 2016 4pm-6pm
Free

“KWTXR” is based on a fictitious character. It is a body of work that memorializes African American victims of police shootings over the past 25 years. It’s central theme is a fantasy narrative in which the character time travels and reverses the outcome of the victim’s confrontation with the police. For more info click here.

South Dallas Cultural Center
3400 S. Fitzhugh Avenue Dallas TX 75210
http://www.dallasculture.org/SDCulturalCenter/
*New Hours: Tues. Thurs. Fri.- 1-9 pm; Wed & Sat. 9-5 pm.

Permanent link to this article: http://artgroupsdfw.com/exhibits-events/afrofuturism-at-the-sdcc/

Black Women’s Film Festival May 13 & 14 at the SDCC

blackwomensfilmfest

IN THE THEATER……

The Black Women’s Film Festival This year we will screen a variety of short films curated by the New York based, New Negress Film Society. Each film will be produced by an emerging black woman filmmaker and will feature some unique genres and perspectives. There will be a talkback session with the visiting filmmakers after the closing credits.

May 13th & 14th @ 8:00 pm – Tickets are $5 in advance and $10 at the box office. The line-up includes:

Afronauts Directed by Frances Bodomo – 16th July 1969: America prepares to launch Apollo 11. Thousands of kilometers away, a ragtag group of Zambian exiles is trying to beat America to the Moon.

Seventh Grade Directed by Stefani Saintonge -Everyone is growing up except Patrice. But when a raunchy rumor threatens her best friend’s reputation, she’s forced to join the party and embrace adolescence.

Cakes Da Killa: NO HOMO – Directed by Ja’Tovia Gary – Born Rashard Bradshaw, Cakes Da Killa is a 22 year old hip hop artist. As an openly gay man he is not your run of the mill rapper, but he just might be your new favorite.

Pain Revisited Directed by Dyani Douze and Nontsikelelo Mutiti – This audiovisual project re-imagines the black body in pain as an agent of potentiality through art and collaboration.

South Dallas Cultural Center
3400 S. Fitzhugh Avenue Dallas TX 75210
http://www.dallasculture.org/SDCulturalCenter/
*New Hours: Tues. Thurs. Fri.- 1-9 pm; Wed & Sat. 9-5 pm.

Permanent link to this article: http://artgroupsdfw.com/video-film/black-womens-film-festival-may-13-14-at-the-sdcc/

Film & Exhibits highlight Black Women’s Month at the SDCC

SDCClogo2015

South Dallas Cultural Center
3400 S. Fitzhugh Avenue Dallas TX 75210
http://www.dallasculture.org/SDCulturalCenter/
We bid a fond farewell to our fearless leader Vicki Meek, but we won’t skip a beat in March because it’s Black Women’s Month!
VickiMeek

I just want to thank everyone who took time to celebrate with me as I move out of my role as Manager of South Dallas Cultural Center into my new role as full-time artist! You made my “retirement” celebration a real blast and I felt the love throughout. I hope you all will continue to celebrate by attending the remaining events planned this month as we showcase Black women making art in a variety of disciplines.

LosingGroundLosing Ground: A groundbreaking film by Kathleen Collins

At the time of her death from cancer in 1988, Kathleen Collins was just 46 years old, but she was already an internationally renowned playwright, a popular professor (at New York’s City College) and a successful independent filmmaker. Her second film and one of the very first fictional features by an African-American woman, Losing Ground remains a stunning and powerful work of art. Accomplished actors Seret Scott (who appeared in Louis Malle’s Pretty Baby and Ntozake Shange’s play “For Colored Girls Who Have Considered Suicide when the Rainbow is Enuf”), Bill Gunn (Ganja and Hess), Duane Jones (Night of the Living Dead) and the late multitalented Billie Allen star in this groundbreaking film. Funny, brilliant and personal, Losing Ground should be ranked high in the canon of indie cinema.

March 18 & 19, 2016 at 7:30 pm FREE
South Dallas Cultural Center Theater

brandall

In the Words of A Sistah is back and Stronger than Ever!

B Randall always produces a spoken word & musical event that features some powerful women voices (and the occasional man!) This year’s event is no exception so you’ll want to grab some friends and get a spot for In The Words of A Sistah! For ticket info, please contact B Randall by emailingthehostbrandall@gmail.com.

Sunday, March 20, 2016 at 5 pm.
South Dallas Cultural Center Theater

 

 

MichelleGibson

We Takin’ It To The Roots Y’all!

Michelle Gibson is a force of nature and her latest dancework, “Takin’ It To The Roots” will take you on a journey to Second Line country like none you’ve ever experienced, we guarantee! Co-commissioned by South Dallas Cultural Center and Ashe Cultural Arts Center in New Orleans, “Takin It To The Roots”includes original music by Brent Nance & Jason Davis, videography by Bart Weiss and script by Jonathan Norton. Musicians adding that genuine Nawlins flava are Kicking Brass Band, Brent Nance, Lin Barnett & Alejandro Perez. All seating is general but patrons purchasing their tickets online will be seated first! This production is made possible in part by National Performance Network/Visual Artists Network Creation Fund, National Endowment for the Arts and Texas Commission on the Arts. Click photo for tickets!

Photo credit: Maria Nunes
March 25-27, 2016 8 pm & 3 pm
South Dallas Cultural Center Theater

TVasquez

IN THE GALLERY
“Septuāgintā duo” by T Vásquez

 

Fort Worth artist T Vasquez exhibits a new body of work that explores issues around domestic violence and its affect on the notion of “home”. Using highly nuanced imagery through the medium of oversized photography and photographic installations, Vásquez forces us to think about the many ways home, sweet home is disrupted even when outward appearances suggest otherwise given the nature of secrecy and shame so often a part of the domestic violence paradigm.

MontoyaWilliams

Blood Memory by Montoya Williams
This exciting new digital photography work by Dallas artist Montoya Williams is inspired by afro-futurism and the concept of secret technology. This exhibition represents Williams first one woman show in Dallas after returning from Atlanta, Georgia where she lived for 8 years.
Both shows close April 30, 2016.
Arthello Beck Gallery
South Dallas Cultural Center
Gallery hours: Tues.,Thurs.Fri.- 2-8 pm; Wed. & Sat. 10am-4 pm. FREE

 

Permanent link to this article: http://artgroupsdfw.com/exhibits-events/film-exhibits-highlight-black-womens-month-at-the-sdcc/

Kijana Martin and Ayo Scott open Jan. 16 at the SDCC

kijanamartinIN THE ARTHELLO BECK GALLERY

“Does My Bow Tie Make it Better?” by Kijana Martin
Dallas area artist Kijana Martin exhibits a new body of work that explores the often treacherous environment African Americans must navigate in their quest to gain acceptance by White America. Using a variety of media, Martin probes the question of what will it take for African Americans to be able to be their natural selves without raising the suspicians, fears and disdain of White America and how is the sociopolitical landscape changing as a new generation of freedom fighters emerges?

ayoscott

HUEman nature series by Ayo Scott
This exciting new work by New Orleans artist Ayo Scott explores our relationship with technology that has us evolving but not necessarily in ways that foster humanity’s interconnectedness. Please be advised this show has nudity and some patrons may find it inappropriate for children.

 

Both shows open at 5-7 pm on Saturday January 16 and close February 27, 2016.
Arthello Beck Gallery
South Dallas Cultural Center
Gallery hours: Tues.,Thurs.Fri.- 2-8 pm; Wed. & Sat. 10am-4 pm. FREE

3400 S. Fitzhugh Avenue Dallas TX 75210
http://www.dallasculture.org/SDCulturalCenter/

Permanent link to this article: http://artgroupsdfw.com/exhibits-events/kijana-martin-and-ayo-scott-open-jan-16-at-the-sdcc/