Tag: Meadows Museum

Meadows & Amon Carter Paintings Paired for Summer Show

William Merritt Chase (1849-1916)
Idle Hours
ca. 1894
Oil on canvas
Amon Carter Museum of American Art, Fort Worth, Texas
1982.1

SUMMER EXHIBITION AT THE MEADOWS TAKES VISITORS TO THE BEACH

19th-century paintings by Mariano Fortuny and William Merritt Chase

shine in first-time pairing

 

DALLAS (SMU) – May 15, 2018 – The Meadows Museum, SMU, presents a focused summer exhibition pairing its recent acquisition Beach at Portici (1874), by Mariano Fortuny y Marsal (1838–1874), with a loan from the Amon Carter Museum of American Art, Idle Hours (1894), by William Merritt Chase (1849–1916). At the Beach: Mariano Fortuny y Marsal and William Merritt Chase explores Chase’s admiration of Fortuny, through two key paintings, one by the American artist and one by his Spanish predecessor, displayed together for the first time June 24 through September 23, 2018.

The depiction of leisure time at the beach was popular in late 19th-century painting, and both Fortuny and Chase used beach scenes to showcase their great skill at rendering light. In both paintings, the artists portray their respective families in fashionable white garments lounging near a curving coastline, Fortuny’s in southern Italy and Chase’s on Long Island, New York. The two paintings even share similar compositions—defined by strong diagonals and a balance of land, sky and figures—as well as loose, fluid brushstrokes that capture the effects bright summer sunlight on earth, sea, sky and skin. Even though the artists were separated by time and geography and never actually met, their paintings transcend distance, representing a dialogue that speaks eloquently of a bond between them.

Mariano Fortuny y Marsal (Spanish 1838–1874), Beach at Portici, 1874. Oil on canvas.

“Chase said of Fortuny, ‘Everything he did was interesting.’ And he was not alone in his admiration for the Spanish painter, who was extremely popular in America at the turn of the century. But while Chase never knew Fortuny the man, he certainly knew Fortuny’s paintings, including Beach at Portici, which Chase would have had ample opportunity to see in America—most notably at the Chicago World’s Fair in 1893, the year before he painted Idle Hours,” says Amanda W. Dotseth, Meadows/Mellon/Prado Fellow and co-curator of the exhibition with Mark A. Roglán, The Linda P. and William A. Custard Director of the Meadows Museum.

“Despite their differing career trajectories,” says Roglán, “each artist achieved fame as a cosmopolitan painter. They were celebrated for these canvases, which present painterly beach scenes with scintillating summer light while celebrating the extraordinary beauty to be found in everyday moments with family.”

This exhibition has been organized by the Meadows Museum and funded by a generous gift from The Meadows Foundation.

Mariano Fortuny y Marsal (Spanish 1838–1874), Seascape (Study for Beach at Portici), 1874. Oil on canvas.

 


The following public programs will complement this exhibition:

Three Thursdays, May 31, June 7 & 14, 6:00–7:30 p.m.

LECTURE SERIES: Light, Camera, Landscape: The Rise of International Impressionism

Nancy Cohen Israel, art historian and owner of Art à la Carte

Technological advances in the 19th century made it possible for artists to work en plein air. The advent of train travel and tubed pigments beckoned urban artists to villages such as Barbizon and Fontainebleau, France. Taking full advantage of natural light, these painters started an artistic revolution. Not only did the Paris School become a magnet attracting artists from across Europe and the United States, but it ultimately sent them back to their home countries, bringing this radical new style with them. This series will trace the rise of Impressionism in France, the offshoots of painters in Spain and Italy, and the aftershocks sent throughout the West.

$40 for the 3-part series; free for Museum members, and SMU faculty, staff, and students; registration required at 214.768.8587

Bob and Jean Smith Auditorium

Saturday, June 23, 10:00 a.m.–1:00 p.m.

COMMUNITY DAY: A Day at the Beach

Spend the day at the beach and take in the light of late 19th century masters Mariano Fortuny y Marsal of Spain and William Merritt Chase of the United States. This special community day will include art making, gallery talks, a storyteller, refreshments, and more!

FREE

Thursday, June 28, 6:00-7:00 p.m.

LECTURE: At the Beach: Mariano Fortuny y Marsal and William Merritt Chase

Mark A. Roglán, The Linda P. and William A. Custard Director of the Meadows Museum

Andrew Walker, Executive Director, Amon Carter Museum of American Art

Join us for this special double lecture examining the creation of Mariano Fortuny y Marsal’s (1883–1874) Beach at Portici, 1874, and William Merritt Chase’s (1849–1916) Idle Hours, 1894, on loan from the Amon Carter Museum of American Art. Many comparisons can be made between these two cosmopolitan painters, Fortuny of Spain and Chase of the United States. The two artists both utilized loose, rapid painting styles akin to French Impressionism. Despite his early death, Fortuny established a popular genre of painting costumed figures set in richly ornamented settings. This fashion of painting was assumed by the younger Chase while he was studying abroad in Europe in the 1870s. The two painters turned to more private and personal scenes in their later work, which will be the subject of this special program held in conjunction with the summer installation At the Beach: Mariano Fortuny y Marsal and William Merritt Chase.

Free; reservations required at 214.768.8587

Bob and Jean Smith Auditorium

 

About the Meadows Museum

The Meadows Museum is the leading U.S. institution focused on the study and presentation of the art of Spain. In 1962, Dallas businessman and philanthropist Algur H. Meadows donated his private collection of Spanish paintings, as well as funds to start a museum, to Southern Methodist University. The Museum opened to the public in 1965, marking the first step in fulfilling Meadows’s vision to create “a small Prado for Texas.” Today, the Meadows is home to one of the largest and most comprehensive collections of Spanish art outside of Spain. The collection spans from the 10th to the 21st centuries and includes medieval objects, Renaissance and Baroque sculptures, and major paintings by Golden Age and modern masters.

Permanent link to this article: http://artgroupsdfw.com/exhibits-events/meadows-amon-carter-paintings-paired-for-summer-show/

Sculpture book launch and signing Mar. 22 – From Rodin to Plensa: Modern Sculpture at the Meadows Museum

Dr. Steven Nash and Laura Wilson
at the Meadows Museum
Thursday, March 22, 6:00 p.m.
Join us for a special double lecture as we launch the publication of From Rodin to Plensa: Modern Sculpture at the Meadows Museum. ­This beautifully designed permanent collection catalogue features new research by Nash about the objects in the Elizabeth Meadows Sculpture collection, along with artistic photographs of the sculptures by Wilson. ­The stunning images Wilson captured for this exceptional book set it apart from a typical catalogue, making it a work of art in its own right. Each will share their experiences working on the project.
Free; reservations required at 214.768.8587.
Bob and Jean Smith Auditorium, Meadows Museum
IMAGE: Marino Marini (Italian, 1901–1980), Horse and Rider (detail), 1951. Bronze. Meadows Museum, SMU, Dallas. Elizabeth Meadows Sculpture Collection, MM.69.01. Photo by Laura Wilson

Following the lecture, we’ll host a reception for the author and photographer in the Gene and Jerry Jones Great Hall, where they’ll sign copies of the book. Books can be purchased in the Meadows Museum Shop, pre-purchased by phone while registering, or purchased on the night of the event ($55).


MEADOWS MUSEUM CATALOGUES ITS MODERN SCULPTURE COLLECTION

 

Book Launch March 23 Features Author Dr. Steven Nash and Photographer Laura Wilson

 

Dallas, TX—March 19, 2018—The Meadows Museum, SMU, announces the publication of From Rodin to Plensa: Modern Sculpture at the Meadows Museum in association with Scala Arts Publishers. Featuring a scholarly essay and catalogue entries by Dr. Steven A. Nash, former director of the Palm Springs Art Museum and founding director of the Nasher Sculpture Center in Dallas, and photographs by noted Dallas photographer Laura Wilson, this is the first publication by the Meadows Museum to exclusively highlight the Museum’s impressive collection of modern sculpture. The book will launch with a double-lecture and book-signing event at 6:00 p.m. on March 22, 2018, during which Nash and Wilson will discuss their contributions to this unique publication. Advance reservations for the event are required at 214-768-8587.

 

The beautifully designed 176-page volume contains nearly 100 full-color images; Wilson’s photographs make one feel close enough to touch the sculptures, revealing aspects the casual observer might not see such as the marks, imprints and signatures made by the artists. Over 30 historical black-and-white images are also included, giving readers behind-the-scenes looks at the creation of Santiago Calatrava’s Wave (2002) and George Rickey’s Two Open Rectangles Horizontal (1983–1984); details about the 2009 re-design of the plaza; and the installations of selected works. Nash’s research tells for the first time the rich story of this important part of the Meadows’s collection and serves as a fitting tribute to Elizabeth Meadows, the inspiration for Algur Meadows’s original donation of a sculpture garden.

 

Said Mark A. Roglán, The Linda P. and William A. Custard Director of the Meadows Museum and Centennial Chair in the Meadows School of the Arts, “It is our hope that, thanks to this volume, people learn more about the artistic richness of modern sculpture at the Meadows Museum and come discover the beauty that these works infuse in our galleries and outside spaces.”

 

In celebration of the book’s publication, from June 24 through August 5, the Meadows Museum will be exhibiting much of its sculpture collection, including some works that have not been on display for some time, including Pablo Picasso’s Owl (Hibou) (1955) and Face and Owl (Visage et Hibou) (1958); Dynamic Angle (Angulo dinámico) (1976) by Helen Escobedo; and Aeróvoro (c. 1979) by Martín Chirino. Another sculpture that will go on view is a rare, previously unpublished work from John Chamberlain’s Penthouse series, Untitled (1969), which appears in the book as part of an appendix that features modern sculpture highlights from SMU’s University Art Collection.

 

Books can be purchased in the Meadows Museum Shop, pre-purchased by phone while registering for the event, or purchased on the night of the event ($55).

 

About the Meadows Museum

The Meadows Museum is the leading U.S. institution focused on the study and presentation of the art of Spain. In 1962, Dallas businessman and philanthropist Algur H. Meadows donated his private collection of Spanish paintings, as well as funds to start a museum, to Southern Methodist University. The Museum opened to the public in 1965, marking the first step in fulfilling Meadows’s vision to create “a small Prado for Texas.”

 

Today, the Meadows is home to one of the largest and most comprehensive collections of Spanish art outside of Spain. The collection spans from the 10th to the 21st centuries and includes medieval objects, Renaissance and Baroque sculptures, and major paintings by Golden Age and modern masters. Since 2010 the Museum has been engaged in a multidimensional partnership with the Museo Nacional del Prado in Madrid, which has included the exchange of scholarship, exhibitions, works of art and other resources.

Permanent link to this article: http://artgroupsdfw.com/exhibits-events/sculpture-book-launch-and-signing-mar-22-from-rodin-to-plensa-modern-sculpture-at-the-meadows-museum/

First Exhibition to Explore Eduardo Chillida’s Multitude of Media to Open at the Meadows Museum

Eduardo Chillida, Year 1963. Photo: Budd, N.Y. © 2017 Zabalaga – Leku, Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / VEGAP, Madrid

 

Related Show Highlights Chillida’s Connections to Dallas

Dallas, TX – February 1, 2018 – This spring, the Meadows Museum will present Dallas’s first exhibition dedicated exclusively to the work of Eduardo Chillida (1924–2002). Chillida, one of Spain’s most celebrated modern sculptors, is famous for his monumental iron and stone sculptures that shape both urban and rural landscapes. This exhibition includes 66 of the artist’s works, from his sculptures, to his drawings, collages, gravitations, graphic works, and a selection of his books. Co-curated by William Jeffett, chief curator of exhibitions for The Dalí Museum, and Ignacio Chillida, the artist’s son, the works in Memory, Mind, Matter: The Sculpture of Eduardo Chillida come exclusively from the Museo Chillida-Leku in Hernani (San Sebastián, Spain); the exhibition travels to Dallas from the Salvador Dalí Museum in St. Petersburg, Florida. A complimentary exhibition, Chillida in Dallas: De Musica at the Meyerson, is curated by Meadows/Mellon/Prado Curatorial Fellow Amanda W. Dotseth and will focus on the landmark commission by Chillida at Dallas’s Morton H. Meyerson Symphony Center. The two exhibitions will open on February 4, 2018, and run through June 3.

Memory, Mind, Matter: The Sculpture of Eduardo Chillida focuses on the mature part of Chillida’s career, when he produced works such as Peine del Viento XV (Wind Comb) in 1976 and Elogio del Horizonte (Eulogy to the Horizon) in 1990, while also presenting important, rarely displayed works. The exhibition addresses the artist’s interest in space and form, which is anchored to the human body and to organic elements found in nature. His works express both the power of nature and humanity’s physical strength. Instead of seeing his works as abstract—an idea Chillida rejected—the exhibition demonstrates his connection to the pre-war avant-garde’s interest in human subjectivity and its poetic notions of form. The exhibition also includes a reflection on the artist’s engagement with poetry and philosophy in his artists’ books, and his admiration for writers of the period.

 

Chillida is also celebrated for the variety of media used in his works, including iron, stone, ceramic, alabaster and paper. His iron and steel sculptures are made of solid metal, while his alabaster works are made from a single piece of stone. His works on paper, known as gravitations, include the layering of pages to create a collage, creating an effect of shadows, weight and tension between the paper. Additionally, the pieces of paper are stitched together, which creates a contrast of negative and positive space in the cut outs. In connection to his Basque roots, Chillida’s works evoke interlocking fingers, arms and hands. He saw hands as an instrument for interaction with the earth: they are how the artist holds and shapes his materials. Eduardo Chillida’s use of natural forms in connection with the Basque country is best described in the artist’s own words: “In my Basque Country I feel at home, like a tree that is adapted to its territory, rooted in its earth but with its arms open to the world.”

 

“Eduardo Chillida is well-known to our community, by sight if not by name, as Dallas is fortunate to be home to one of his most important public sculptures,” said Mark Roglán, the Linda P. and William A. Custard Director of the Meadows Museum. “This exhibition shows Chillida’s different sides through his visionary use of materials, from the power of stone to the lightness of paper. We are thrilled to bring these works to Dallas and expand our understanding of one of the most important and influential modern Spanish sculptors.”

 

Chillida in Dallas: De música at the Meyerson, explores the monumental sculpture located in front of the Morton H. Myerson Symphony Center in Dallas. Chillida was selected for the commission by the Dallas Symphony Foundation Arts Committee, in close consultation with architect and Committee member I.M. Pei. What resulted was the impressive De música, Dallas XV (On Music, Dallas XV), which contains two imposing 15-foot-high cylinders of more than 3 feet in diameter, with commanding and elegant arm-like extensions. The work embodies Chillida’s artistic philosophy, his interest in Saint Augustine (after whose treatise on music the sculpture is named), and in the mystical number three. De música is the only public work by Chillida on display in Dallas and represents a dialogue between Chillida and architect I. M. Pei, who designed the Symphony Center’s glass and granite building.

 

Memory, Mind, Matter: The Sculpture of Eduardo Chillida will be accompanied by a catalogue with full color illustrations of the 66 works by Eduardo Chillida in the exhibition, along with an introduction by the artist’s son Ignacio Chillida, and essays by Hank Hine (Director of The Dalí Museum), Nausica Sanchez (Fundación Eduardo Chillida-Pilar Belzunce), and William Jeffett. The catalogue includes the artist’s biography, use of media, distinctive motifs, and artists’ books.

 

Chillida-related educational programming for the spring will include:

 

Friday, February 2, 10:30 a.m.

LECTURE: Memory, Mind, Matter: The Public Art of Eduardo Chillida in Focus

Luis Chillida, director, Fundación Eduardo Chillida-Pilar Belzunce

 

Friday, February 16, 12:15 p.m.

GALLERY TALK: Medieval and Modern: Alabaster from Gil de Siloé to Eduardo Chillida

Amanda W. Dotseth, Meadows/Mellon/Prado curatorial fellow, Meadows Museum

 

Thursday, April 19, 6:00-7:00 p.m.

LECTURE: Lightness and Rightness: Eduardo Chillida and James Johnson Sweeney in the Museum of

Fine Arts, Houston

Beatriz Cordero, professor, Saint Louis University, Madrid

 

Friday, April 20, 12:15 p.m.

GALLERY TALK: Chillida in Dallas Part I: Chillida Downtown

Jed Morse, chief curator, Nasher Sculpture Center

 

Saturday, April 21, 10:00 a.m.-1:00 p.m.

FAMILY DAY

 

Friday, April 27, 12:15 p.m.

GALLERY TALK: Chillida in Dallas Part II: Chillida in Dallas

Scott Winterrowd, director of education, Meadows Museum

 

Born in San Sebastián, Spain, in the Basque region, Eduardo Chillida’s works are international, located in Spain, Europe, and the Americas. Throughout his career, Chillida debuted exhibitions at The Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum and Museum of Modern Art in New York, including retrospectives at the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston (1966), and the Carnegie Institute in Pittsburgh (1979). He received several awards, including the Graham Foundation Award for Advanced Studies in the Fine Arts, the International Grand Prize for Sculpture at the Venice Biennale, both in 1958; the Kandinsky Prize in 1960; and the Carnegie Prize in 1964 and in 1979, shared with painter Willem de Kooning.

 

This exhibition is co-organized by The Dalí Museum and Fundación Eduardo Chillida–Pilar Belzunce, in collaboration with the Meadows Museum, SMU, Dallas. Additional support for the Meadows Museum’s presentation is generously provided by The Meadows Foundation.

 

About the Fundación Eduardo Chillida–Pilar Belzunce

All works presented in Memory, Mind, Matter: The Sculpture of Eduardo Chillida have been graciously loaned by the Fundación Eduardo Chillida–Pilar Belzunce. The foundation was created in 2000 and is based in Hernani, Spain. The foundation was formed with the purpose to “deepen the knowledge of the artistic work of Mr. Eduardo Chillida Juantegui, promoting its knowledge and dissemination.” The foundation is connected with the Museo Chillida-Leku which opened in 2000. The museum showcases the largest collection of Eduardo Chillida’s work and provides an intimate space for visitors to enjoy the works of this great, modern sculptor.

 

About the Meadows Museum

The Meadows Museum is the leading U.S. institution focused on the study and presentation of the art of Spain. In 1962, Dallas businessman and philanthropist Algur H. Meadows donated his private collection of Spanish paintings, as well as funds to start a museum, to Southern Methodist University. The museum opened to the public in 1965, marking the first step in fulfilling Meadows’s vision to create “a small Prado for Texas.”

 

Today, the Meadows is home to one of the largest and most comprehensive collections of Spanish art outside Spain. The collection spans from the 10th to the 21st centuries and includes medieval objects, Renaissance and Baroque sculptures, and major paintings by Golden Age and modern masters. Since 2010 the museum has been engaged in a multidimensional partnership with the Museo Nacional del Prado in Madrid, which has included the exchange of scholarship, exhibitions, works of art, and other resources.

https://meadowsmuseumdallas.org    5900 Bishop Blvd., Dallas, TX 75205

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MEADOWS MUSEUM accepting applications for 2017 MOSS/CHUMLEY NORTH TEXAS ARTIST AWARD

DALLAS (SMU), November 2, 2017— The Meadows Museum at SMU is accepting applications now through January 31, 2018, from area artists for the Moss/Chumley North Texas Artist Award. The award is given annually to an outstanding North Texas artist who has exhibited professionally for at least ten years and who has a proven track record as an active community advocate for the visual arts. The cash prize for the award is $2,500. The award recipient will be invited to install work at the museum for approximately one month, and will also be given the opportunity to host a gallery talk; both activities to occur in spring 2018, but neither are required of the award recipient. The competition is accepting entries in the genres of drawing, painting, sculpture, assemblage, construction, video, photography, performance, and installation. To be eligible, an artist must reside in one of the following North Texas counties: Collin, Dallas, Denton, Ellis, Hunt, Johnson, Kaufman, Parker, Rockwall, Tarrant, or Wise. To enter, visit www.meadowsmuseumdallas.org/about-us/mosschumley-award/ to download an application. For questions, contact Shelley DeMaria (214-768-4246; sdemaria@smu.edu).

 

The following individuals have been named to the jury for the 2017 award:

Leigh Arnold, assistant curator, Nasher Sculpture Center

Joan Davidow, co-director, SITE131; director emerita, Dallas Contemporary

Sedrick Huckaby, assistant professor of painting, University of Texas at Arlington; 2016 Moss/Chumley

recipient

David Leggett, photographer; senior development manager, TACA

Christina Rees, editor-in-chief, Glasstire

Nicole Atzbach, curator, Meadows Museum, SMU

Shelley DeMaria, curatorial assistant, Meadows Museum, SMU

 

The Moss/Chumley Memorial Fund was begun in 1989 by Frank Moss and the Meadows Museum as a tribute to Jim Chumley; Moss’s name was added to the fund upon his death in 1991. Moss and Chumley were two Dallas art dealers who made outstanding contributions to the visual arts in North Texas during the 1980s. The pair operated the Nimbus Gallery on Routh Street from 1980 to 1987 and the Moss/Chumley Gallery at the Crescent Court from 1986 to 1989, where they showcased numerous new artists. Established in 1995, the Moss/Chumley North Texas Artist Award is given in their memory.

The winner will be announced in February 2018.

 

About the Meadows Museum

The Meadows Museum is the leading U.S. institution focused on the study and presentation of the art of Spain. In 1962, Dallas businessman and philanthropist Algur H. Meadows donated his private collection of Spanish paintings, as well as funds to start a museum, to Southern Methodist University. The Museum opened to the public in 1965, marking the first step in fulfilling Meadows’s vision to create “a small Prado for Texas.”

 

Today, the Meadows is home to one of the largest and most comprehensive collections of Spanish art outside of Spain. The collection spans from the 10th to the 21st centuries and includes medieval objects, Renaissance and Baroque sculptures, and major paintings by Golden Age and modern masters. Since 2010 the Museum has been engaged in a multidimensional partnership with the Museo Nacional del Prado in Madrid, which has included the exchange of scholarship, exhibitions, works of art, and other resources.

 

For more information, please contact:

Carrie L. Sanger

Marketing & PR Manager

Meadows Museum

214-768-1584

csanger@smu.edu

 

Permanent link to this article: http://artgroupsdfw.com/opportunities-for-artists/meadows-museum-accepting-applications-for-2017-mosschumley-north-texas-artist-award/

MEADOWS MUSEUM ACQUIRES LAST PAINTING OF SPANISH MASTER MARIANO FORTUNY Y MARSAL

In the Private Collection of an American Family Since Fortuny’s Death, It Represented the

Best of Foreign Art in the Americas at 1893 Chicago World’s Fair

 

DALLAS (SMU), January 18, 2018— The Meadows Museum, SMU, announced today that it has acquired Beach at Portici, the last painting of famed Spanish artist Mariano Fortuny y Marsal (1838-1874). The nearly finished painting—which is unusual for its large scale, relative to much of the artist’s work—depicts the enjoyment of a summer day at the beach, and demonstrates Fortuny’s hallmark ability to capture light in paint. Fortuny was an especially popular artist with 19th-century American collectors and audiences, as the particularly American provenance of this work reveals. Reflecting the high esteem in which Fortuny’s works were held, Beach at Portici was featured prominently in the American Pavilion’s “Loan Collection of Foreign Masterpieces Owned in the United States” at the 1893 World’s Columbian Exposition in Chicago. Considered one of the most important international exhibitions of the 19th century, these works were selected to show off to the Fair’s wide audiences—more than 27 million people visited during its six-month run—the richness and breadth of paintings owned by American collectors and museums, and implicitly, American economic prowess, and refined taste in fine art.

Beach at Portici will be on view at the Meadows Museum beginning January 19, 2018. From June 24 through September 23, it will be the subject of a focused exhibition, At the Beach: Mariano Fortuny y Marsal and William Merritt Chase, where it will be paired with a loan from the Amon Carter Museum of American Art, Chase’s Idle Hours (c. 1894). The Spanish artist had a significant impact on many important American artists and perhaps especially on Chase, who knew his work well and greatly admired it.

In the artist’s possession at the time of his death, Beach at Portici was acquired by the prominent New York collector Alexander Turney Stewart in 1875, and remained with Stewart’s heirs on the East Coast until the Meadows acquired it. The acquisition complements the only oil painting by the artist currently in the Museum’s collection: a smaller, study composition for the painting of the same stretch of beach at Portici. The newly acquired painting includes essential elements of Fortuny’s developing style, such as the dynamically posed figures, the use of strong architectural elements in the background to define the space around the figures, brushwork that anticipates the rise of Impressionism, and meticulous attention to detail.

“Painted in Italy, sold in Paris after his death, and owned exclusively by American collectors in the decades since, Beach at Portici embodies the international character of Fortuny’s brief career,” said Mark Roglán, the Linda P. and William A. Custard Director of the Meadows Museum. “For these reasons, as well as its obvious beauty, it makes a perfect acquisition for the Meadows, addressing our mission to bring the best of Spanish art to American audiences, and to highlight its role in the development of America’s own culture and aesthetic.”

Beach at Portici demonstrates the evolution in Fortuny’s painterly technique as his career progressed, and highlights why his works were so celebrated and sought-after both during his lifetime and after his death. His landscapes capture the extraordinary beauty in everyday moments, and in this work—with the contrast between the extreme attention to detail in some places, such as the trees, beach, and ruins in the background, and his loose handling of paint in other areas, such as the foliage in the foreground of the painting—the viewer can see hints at how his style might have continued to develop had he lived.

Mariano Fortuny y Marsal was born in the Catalonia region of Spain and did his early training in Barcelona, before leaving for further study in Rome. He subsequently spent most of his brief working life in Italy or France, interwoven with travel in Morocco and other parts of North Africa, as well as in southern Spain. During his travels, Fortuny collected carpets, Hispano-Moresque pottery, Islamic metalwork, arms and armor, fabrics and textiles, all of which influenced both the style and subject of his work. His drawings and paintings of historical subjects—such as of the Spanish-Moroccan War (1859-1860), which he memorialized in the painting The Battle of Tetuan (1862-1864)—and his other depictions of 18th-century courtly life, were so popular that the term Fortunismo came to be applied to any artistic representation of those themes during this period. Despite his short life, he is known to have been very prolific.

With his wide-ranging travels and long history of working outside of his home country, Fortuny represents the first generation of truly cosmopolitan Spanish painters. Likewise, the development of his style parallels larger trends in Spanish painting, particularly in the context of European modernism. Fortuny’s works were equally popular in America during his lifetime and in subsequent decades and were acquired by a number of prestigious public institutions here including: the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston; the Harvard Art Museums; the National Gallery of Art, Washington, DC; the Walters Art Museum, Baltimore; and the Hispanic Society of America, New York City.

Beach at Portici was purchased with funds from Mary Anne Cree, Mrs. Eugene McDermott, Susan Heldt Albritton, Linda P. and William A. Custard, Gwen and Richard Irwin, Shirley and Bill McIntyre, Cyrena Nolan, Peggy and Carl Sewell, Pilar and Jay Henry, Barbara and Mike McKenzie, Caren Prothro, Marilyn Augur, Dr. and Mrs. Lawrence S. Barzune, Diane and Stuart Bumpas, The Honorable Janet Kafka and Mr. Terry Kafka, the Mr. and Mrs. Walter M. Levy Fund of Communities Foundation of Texas, Stacey and Nicholas McCord, Linda and John McFarland, Catherine Blaffer Taylor, Julie and George Tobolowsky, Cheryl and Kevin Vogel, Diane and P. Gregory Warden, Natalie and George Lee, Bethany and Samuel Holland, President R. Gerald and Gail Turner, Kathleen and Mark Roglán, and an Anonymous Donor.

 

About the Meadows Museum

The Meadows Museum is the leading U.S. institution focused on the study and presentation of the art of Spain. In 1962, Dallas businessman and philanthropist Algur H. Meadows donated his private collection of Spanish paintings, as well as funds to start a museum, to Southern Methodist University. The Museum opened to the public in 1965, marking the first step in fulfilling Meadows’s vision to create “a small Prado for Texas.”

Today, the Meadows is home to one of the largest and most comprehensive collections of Spanish art outside of Spain. The collection spans from the 10th to the 21st centuries and includes medieval objects, Renaissance and Baroque sculptures, and major paintings by Golden Age and modern masters. Since 2010 the Museum has been engaged in a multidimensional partnership with the Museo Nacional del Prado in Madrid, which has included the exchange of scholarship, exhibitions, works of art, and other resources.

Permanent link to this article: http://artgroupsdfw.com/exhibits-events/meadows-museum-acquires-last-painting-of-spanish-master-mariano-fortuny-y-marsal/

Art and Religion Symposium at the Meadows Museum Nov. 14

Jacob and His Twelve Sons:
The Intersection of Art and World Religions
Tuesday, November 14, 9:30 a.m. – 4:30 p.m.

Shira Lander, professor of practice and director of Jewish studies, Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, SMU
Imam Abdul Rahman Bashir, Islamic Association of Allen
Ted Campbell, professor of Church history, Perkins School of Theology, SMU
Ken Andrien, Edmund J. and Louise W. Kahn Chair in Colonial Latin American History, Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, SMU
Adam Jasienski, assistant professor of art history, Meadows School of the Arts, SMU
Larry Palmer, Professor Emeritus of Harpsichord and Organ, Meadows School of the Arts, SMU Bob and Jean Smith Auditorium

Join local scholars and SMU faculty experts for a daylong symposium examining a monumental series of religious paintings by the seventeenth-century Spanish master Francisco de Zurbarán. The morning program will engage in a conversation exploring the religious context and significance of Zurbarán’s works from the vantage points of Judaism, Islam, and Christianity, while the afternoon sessions will focus on broad historical, art historical, and musical contexts. The program will culminate in the evening with a keynote lecture and conversation on the timeless theme of faith in the arts led by the celebrated theologian and author N.T. Wright.
FREE; advance registration is required. To register, please call 214.768.8587.

Bob and Jean Smith Auditorium, Meadows Museum

TOP: Photo by Hillsman Jackson

RIGHT: Francisco de Zurbarán (Spanish, 1598-1664)

Jacob and the Bishop:
Where Faith and Art Meet
Tuesday, November 14, 7:30 p.m
N.T. Wright, Research Professor of New Testament and Early Christianity at St. Mary’s College, University of St. Andrews, Scotland
Bishop Richard Trevor of Durham bought Jacob and His Twelve Sons by the Spanish master Francisco de Zurbarán in 1756, and extended the Long Dining Room at Auckland Castle to provide a worthy showcase for the group. The purchase of the series was intended to communicate to the leaders of northern England the fact, which was very controversial at the time and from time to time since then, that the Jewish people and their traditions have a valued and honored place in national life. Apart from brief absences for exhibitions, the paintings have been there ever since, still conveying the same message for consideration by today’s pluralistic society. The paintings invite contemplation of the way in which art reflects on ancient traditions and out into the wider world. They also communicate the way in which faith and art, so often polarized today, can and perhaps should inform and reinforce one another. As the former Bishop of Durham, Wright lived daily in the presence of Zurbarán’s Jacob and His Twelve Sons at Auckland Castle.
FREE; Seating is first come, first served.
OFFSITE! Highland Park United Methodist Church, Wesley Hall

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May News from the Meadows Museum at SMU

Thismonthatthe Meadows

CURRENT EXHIBITIONS
riberadrawings
Between Heaven and Hell:
The Drawings of Jusepe de Ribera
March 12 – June 11
In the most comprehensive presentation ever dedicated
to the artist’s drawings – and the first major monographic
exhibition organized on the artist in the United States in the last 25 years – the Meadows Museum, in collaboration
with the Museo Nacional del Prado, presents an exhibition of about a third of the artist’s surviving drawings, plus a small selection of paintings and prints. Learn More

This exhibition has been organized by the Meadows Museum and the Museo Nacional del Prado and funded by a generous gift from The Meadows Foundation.

Picasso’s Dream and Lie of Franco:
The Spanish Civil War in Print
April 2 – July 2

This exhibition showcases a pair of prints in the Meadows collection that was transformed by the painting Guernica: Picasso’s Dream and Lie of Franco. Displayed alongside Spanish Civil War posters from the Meadows collection, they offer a thematic and visual-cultural context for Picasso’s graphic works. Learn More

This exhibition has been organized by the Meadows
Museum and funded by a generous gift from The
Meadows Foundation.

 

NEWS

 

MOTHER’S DAY IS MAY 14

We have Mother’s Day gifts for every budget! From this Betsy Simpson Mother-of-Pearl Flower and Freshwater Teardrop Pearl Necklace, with sterling silver centers and Swarovski crystals ($245.00), to charming hand-stamped, carved, and raku-fired mosaic tiles by lifelong friends and artists Romy Kissel and Clare Bies ($19.50), gifts are available for every taste and style. Visit the Meadows Museum Shop today!

MAY 18 IS ART MUSEUM DAY

Celebrate Art Museum Day with a visit to the Meadows Museum-on us! Today we recognize the vital role museums play as cultural, educational, and economic anchors, helping make their communities great places to live and work. Admission is FREE all day, and a free guided tour of the special exhibition Between Heaven and Hell: The Drawings of Jusepe de Ribera

is offered at 6:30 p.m. Join us in support of museums everywhere on social media with the hashtag #ArtMuseumDay.

BLUE STAR MUSEUMS KICKS OFF MAY 29

Blue Star Museums is a collaboration among the National Endowment for the Arts, Blue Star Families, the Department of Defense, and museums across America.  Each summer since 2010, Blue Star Museums have offered free admission to the nation’s active-duty military personnel and their families, including National Guard and Reserve, from Memorial Day through Labor Day. (The Meadows Museum honors this discount all year long.)

 

MEMBER NEWS and EVENTS

 

MEMBERS MEETUP
Sculpture Stroll: Discovering Modern Sculpture at the Meadows Museum
Thursday, May 18, 6:00 – 7:30 P.M.

Join members of our curatorial staff as they give a tour of the Elizabeth Meadows Sculpture Collection.  This collection, known originally as the Elizabeth Meadows Sculpture Garden, was a second generous gift to SMU from Mr. Meadows to honor his second wife. Members will gain insight into the history of the plaza and how the museum came to be the home for this breathtaking collection of modern and contemporary sculpture. Reception with wine and edible fare to follow. $35 per person. Space is limited to 30 and advance, credit-card registration is required. To register, please contact membership associate Kasey Abernathy at krabernathy@smu.edu or 214.768.1310.

 

 

CALENDAR

 

 

LECTURES

 

Diego Rodríguez de Silva y Velázquez, Las Meninas (detail). .
BodartLos borrones de Ticiano: The Venetian Brushstroke and Its Spanish Translations
Friday, May 5, 6:00 P.M.
Diane Bodart, David Rosand Assistant Professor of Italian Renaissance Art History, Columbia University
From Venice to Spain, from Titian to Velázquez, the definition of the painterly brushwork uses a vocabulary of failure related to the idea of stain-a formless area of color that soils or conceals the surface underneath. This lecture will investigate the transformative process of the interpretation of Titian’s model in Spain. Bodart’s lecture is the closing event for our Fellows Colloquium; a reception follows in the Gene and Jerry Jones Great Hall. Free; advance reservation required. To book your reservation, call 214-768-8587. Learn More

Bob and Jean Smith Auditorium

 

FAMILY FUN

 

ReconRe-Connections
Friday, May 12, 10:30 A.M. – 12:00 P.M.

Individuals with early stage dementia, their care partners and family members are invited to attend this relaxed social gathering. Attendees visit with friends over coffee and light refreshments, explore the galleries, and enjoy an informal gallery activity. Free; registration is encouraged but not required atmuseumaccess@smu.edu or 214.768.3980.

 

DrawingDrawing from the Masters
Sundays, May 7 & 21, 1:30 – 3 P.M.

Enjoy afternoons of informal drawing instruction as artist Ian O’Brien leads you through the Meadows Museum’s galleries. Each session will provide an opportunity to explore a variety of techniques and improve drawing skills.Learn More

 

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Meadows Museum SMU Dallas
Meadows Museum Hours of Operation:
Tuesday-Saturday 10:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.
Thursday until 9:00 p.m. (free after 5:00 p.m.)
Sunday 1:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m.
Monday CLOSED

 

Permanent link to this article: http://artgroupsdfw.com/exhibits-events/may-news-from-meadows-museum-at-smu/

Between Heaven and Hell: The Drawings of Jusepe de Ribera opens March 12 at Meadows Museum

BetweenHeavenandHell

Opening March 12, 2017, Between Heaven and Hell: The Drawings of Jusepe de Ribera will be the most comprehensive presentation ever dedicated to the artist’s drawings—and the first major monographic exhibition organized on the artist in the United States in the last 25 years.

http://www.meadowsmuseumdallas.org/about_Ribera_Drawings.htm

47 of Ribera’s drawings (nearly a third of the artist’s surviving output), 12 prints, 11 paintings, and one relief sculpture will be on display, demonstrating the technical skill and extraordinary originality of this Golden Age master. Co-organized with the Museo Nacional del Prado, the exhibition marks the publication of the first catalogue raisonné of the artist’s drawings, published jointly by the Meadows Museum, the Museo Nacional del Prado, and Fundación Focus. The Meadows Museum is the only U.S. venue for this exhibition.

Meadows Museum, 5900 Bishop Blvd., Dallas, TX 75205

 

Permanent link to this article: http://artgroupsdfw.com/exhibits-events/between-heaven-and-hell-the-drawings-of-jusepe-de-ribera-opens-march-12-at-meadows-museum/

Meadows Lecture Series: Reflecting on Ribera: Art and Culture in Spain and Spanish Naples, 1600-1700

meadowslectureseries
LUIS MARTÍN LECTURE SERIES IN THE HUMANITIES

Reflecting on Ribera:
Art and Culture in Spain and Spanish Naples, 1600-1700
Four Fridays, February 3 – March 3, 10:30 a.m. – 11:00 a.m.
Adam Jasienski, assistant professor of art history, SMU

This lecture series investigates the world and work of Spanish-born artist Jusepe de Ribera (1591-1652), the subject of the forthcoming exhibition  Between Heaven and Hell: The Drawings of Jusepe de Ribera

meadowslectureseries2(opening March 12). A careful analysis of specific artworks by Ribera and his contemporaries will situate the artist within the broader context of the global Iberian empire, in which his chosen hometown of Naples played an integral role. Some of the themes examined will include Ribera’s confrontation with the legacies of Caravaggio and Domenichino, his penchant for violent scenes of martyrdom and suffering, the appeal of his stark realism, and his creation of images that were both effective religious objects and cutting-edge contemporary artworks. Coffee and pastries served in the Founders Room before each lecture at 10 a.m.

 

Advance registration required. $50 for the 4-part series; free for Museum members, SMU staff, faculty and students. To register, please call 214.768.8587.

Bob and Jean Smith Auditorium


This program is made possible by gifts from The Fannie and Stephen Kahn Charitable Foundation and The Eugene McDermott Foundation.

IMAGES
TOP: Jusepe de Ribera (Spanish, 1591-1652), Apollo and Marsyas, 1637. Oil on canvas. Museo Nazionale di Capodimonte, Naples. Quintavalle, 511. ABOVE LEFT: Jusepe de Ribera (Spanish, 1591-1652), Study for Martyrdom of Saint Sebastian, c. 1626. Red chalk on paper. William Lowe Bryan Memorial, Eskenazi Museum of Art, Indiana University, 57.7. Photo by Kevin Montague.


MeadowsMuseumlogo
 Meadows Museum at SMU, 5900 Bishop Blvd., Southern Methodist University, Dallas, TX 75205

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Sedrick Huckaby named 2016 Moss/Chumley North Texas Artist Award Winner

SedrickHuckabyMossChumley

MEADOWS MUSEUM ANNOUNCES

2016 MOSS/CHUMLEY ARTIST AWARD WINNER SEDRICK HUCKABY

Dallas, TX—January 20, 2017—The Meadows Museum at SMU announces that Sedrick Huckaby has won the 2016 Moss/Chumley North Texas Artist Award. The award is given annually to an outstanding North Texas artist who has exhibited professionally for at least ten years and has established a proven track record as a community advocate for the visual arts. Huckaby received the award last night at a private reception held at the Museum; his portrait Rising, Sonny, Son (2014) will be on view at the Museum through February 12.

“Huckaby is both interpreter and innovator. His portraits reveal a deep knowledge of a centuries-old painting tradition that, through depicting his own reality, Huckaby has made into an art that is truly authentic to him,“ said Nicole Atzbach, Meadows Museum curator and chair of the jury panel.

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This year’s Moss/Chumley Award winner is a Fort Worth native known for large-scale paintings incorporating a thick, impasto technique. Drawing inspiration from his African-American roots, his subject matter has shifted over the years from paintings of traditional quilts to insightful portraits of himself, family and friends. His latest work, incorporating mixed media, delves into the subject of incarceration. His self-portrait Sedrick, Sed, Daddy (2014) was a finalist in the distinguished 2016 Outwin Boochever Portrait Competition at the National Portrait Gallery, in Washington, DC, and featured in the competition’s resulting exhibition The Outwin 2016: American Portraiture Today. Huckaby’s recent solo exhibitions include Sedrick Huckaby, Valley House Gallery & Sculpture Garden, Dallas, Texas (2016); Sedrick Huckaby: The 99%, UNT ArtSpace Dallas, University of North Texas, Dallas, Texas (2015); and Just A Few Patches, Walton Art Center, Fayetteville, Arkansas (2014). He has exhibited at art fairs in Dallas, Houston, Los Angeles, Cleveland and Chicago. His work can be found in the collections of the Art Institute of Chicago, Minneapolis Institute of Art and the Whitney Museum of American Art, among others.

Jury member Joan Davidow, director emerita of the Dallas Contemporary, commented, “I’ve watched his work mature in the years since his solo show as part of our Mix! Series. Those early patchwork quilt paintings were luscious! The work was personal, energetic and fresh…and I learned he was a lovely human being to boot. He deserved to be seen.” David Leggett, another jury member, as well as the Meadows Museum’s membership manager and a practicing artist, said, “For me his work has a colorful warmth. It is not only beautiful (especially his quilts and the familiar legacy he paints with regard to quilts), but his latest work If Perhaps by Chance, I Find Myself Encaged (2016) seizes the social-political struggles and issues of today. His work may be autobiographical but it’s also relevant.”

The Moss/Chumley Award was founded to recognize not only talented artists living in North Texas, but also to acknowledge those who have proven track records as community advocates for the arts. Huckaby consistently works to cultivate and encourage young artists by leading workshops for high school and community college students, performing speaking engagements at local schools, and serving as a juror or judge at student art shows. His community involvement also extends to ACT-SO (Afro-Academic, Cultural, Technological and Scientific Olympics), The KEEN Group, Imagination Celebration, and the Dallas Children’s Advocacy Center.

At the reception Huckaby remarked, “I am humbled to be the recipient of the Moss/Chumley award because it is an award that is not just based on the merit of the work, but also on the merit of the person.”

Sedrick Huckaby obtained a bachelor of fine arts degree from Boston University and a master of fine arts degree from Yale University. Upon graduation, Huckaby was the recipient of numerous awards and honors. With funds from the Alice Kimball English Traveling Fellowship, Huckaby was able to travel the U.S. and abroad studying the works of Henry Tanner. Huckaby returned from European travels in 2001, and after settling back into his home town of Fort Worth, he began to work and teach there. Winner of a Guggenheim Fellowship and a Joan Mitchell Foundation Grant, he is presently assistant professor of painting in the Art Department of the University of Texas at Arlington.

The jury for the 2016 Moss/Chumley award included Atzbach and Leggett as noted above; Danielle Avram, freelance arts writer and gallery director, Texas Woman’s University;  Joan Davidow, co-director, SITE131 and director emerita, Dallas Contemporary; Shelley DeMaria, curatorial assistant, Meadows Museum; Heyd Fontenot, artist and former director of Central Trak; and Annette Lawrence, 2015 winner of the Moss/Chumley Award and professor and chair of studio art, University of North Texas.

SedrickHuckabyMossChumley3

Moss/Chumley Memorial Fund and Artist Award

The Moss/Chumley Memorial Fund was created in 1989 by Frank Moss and the Meadows Museum as a tribute to Jim Chumley; Moss’s name was added to the fund upon his death in 1991. Moss and Chumley were two Dallas art dealers who made outstanding contributions to the visual arts in North Texas during the 1980s. The pair operated the Nimbus Gallery on Routh Street from 1980 to 1987 and the Moss/Chumley Gallery at the Crescent Court from 1986 to 1989, where they showcased numerous new artists.

 

Established in 1995, the Moss/Chumley Artist Award is given in their memory.  The award—which carries a cash prize of $2,500—is open to artists working in any medium who live in one of the eleven North Texas counties: Collin, Dallas, Denton, Ellis, Hunt, Johnson, Kaufman, Parker, Rockwall, Tarrant and Wise.

Past recipients have included Isabelle duToit, Juliette McCullough, Catherine Chauvin, Kaleta Doolin, David Dreyer, Susan Kae Grant, David Hickman, Tracy Hicks, Stephen Lapthisophon, Darryl Lauster, David McCullough, Bob Nunn, Sherry Owens, Ludwig Schwarz, Noah Simblist, Janet Tyson, Marie Van Arsdale, Mary Vernon, Marilyn Waligore and Christopher Blay.

About the Meadows Museum

The Meadows Museum is the leading U.S. institution focused on the study and presentation of the art of Spain. In 1962, Dallas businessman and philanthropist Algur H. Meadows donated his private collection of Spanish paintings, as well as funds to start a museum, to Southern Methodist University. The Museum opened to the public in 1965, marking the first step in fulfilling Meadows’s vision to create “a small Prado for Texas.”

Today, the Meadows is home to one of the largest and most comprehensive collections of Spanish art outside of Spain. The collection spans from the 10th to the 21st centuries and includes medieval objects, Renaissance and Baroque sculptures, and major paintings by Golden Age and modern masters. Since 2010 the Museum has been engaged in a multidimensional partnership with the Museo Nacional del Prado in Madrid, which has included the exchange of scholarship, exhibitions, works of art and other resources.

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Dr. Mark Roglán Honored at 28th Annual Obelisk Awards

obeliskawards

Each year, The Obelisk Awards recognize the extraordinary achievements that can be obtained when commerce and culture unite.

Congratulations Dr. Mark A. Roglán
The Linda P. and William A. Custard Director of the Meadows Museum

Inaugural Recipient
“Visionary Nonprofit Arts Leader”

Pictured above with Kevin Hurst, Neiman Marcus Director of Charitable Giving and
Co-chair of the 28th Annual Obelisk Awards Luncheon.
Learn More

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April News from Meadows Museum at SMU

thismonthatthemeadows
CALENDAR

LECTURES

carlottacorpronturningpointsTurning Points: Carlotta Corpron and Me
Thursday, April 7, 6:00 P.M.
Beverly Wilgus, Independent photographic historian and collector
Wilgus will examine her life as a photographer, teacher, and collector, and discuss her time at Texas Woman’s University where she studied under photography instructor Carlotta Corpron. Through her firsthand account and personal perspective as Corpron’s former student, Wilgus will explore how this experience opened up unexpected paths in her life and reveal the courage that Corpron inspired through her teaching. Wilgus’s work will also be featured in the exhibitionProcess and Innovation: Carlotta Corpron and Janet Turner.FREE! Priority seating for Museum members until 5:40 p.m.
Bob and Jean Smith Auditorium

GALLERY TALKS

 ART IN FOCUS
Claudio Castelucho, Portrait of Marie Cronin, c. 1906
Wednesday, April 6, 12:15 P.M.
Nicole Atzbach, Curator, Meadows Museum
Monthly, 15-minute talks about objects in the permanent collection by members of the Museum staff encourage a range of approaches to exploring the visual arts, provide a unique perspective, and invite visitors to look more closely at individual objects. Free with regular Museum admission. Virginia Meadows Galleries

 

Artist Demonstration: Revealing the Mysterious Layers in Janet Turner’s Prints
Friday, April 22, 12:15 P.M.
Terri Thoman, Printmaker and Co-owner of PaperArts
Meadows Museum gallery talks feature art research and perspectives from staff, local guest speakers, and students. Free with regular Museum admission.

FAMILY FUN

Drawing from the Masters
Drawing from the Masters
Sundays, April 3 & 17, 1:30-3:00 P.M.
Enjoy afternoons of informal drawing instruction as
artist Ian O’Brien leads you through the Meadows
Museum’s galleries. Each session will provide an
opportunity to explore a variety of techniques and
improve drawing skills. Designed for adults and
students ages 15 and older, and open to all abilities
and experience levels. Drawing materials will be
available, but participants are encouraged to bring
their own sketchpads and pencils. Free with regular Museum admission; no advance registration required.Attendance is limited to 20 and based on a first-come, first-served basis. For more information or to request adaptive materials for participants with low vision,
contact Carmen Smith at mcarmens@smu.edu or
214.768.4677.

Connections
Three Wednesdays, April 6, 13 & 20, 10:30 A.M.-12:30 P.M.
This informal three-day program is designed for individuals
with early stage dementia, their care partners, and family members. Participants will explore the galleries through interactive activities, create individual and group projects,
and discover works of art through music, dance, literature,
storytelling and role play. Light refreshments will be served. The program takes place on three consecutive
Wednesdays. Free; space is limited and advance registration is required. For more information and to register, contact Carmen Smith at mcarmens@smu.edu or call214.768.4677.

 

FOUNDERS’ DAY WEEKEND AT SMU
April 15-16
Get ready for two days of Mustang pride and family fun as SMU celebrates the first Founders’ Day Weekend of the University’s second century on April 15 and 16. The Meadows Museum offers free admission both days and an Open House on Saturday 10:00 a.m.-1:00 p.m.
Learn More

A SURREAL EXPERIENCE

Visit the Museum Shop for Dalí-related merchandise, perfect for upcoming Mother’s Day, Graduation, and Father’s Day gifts!

CURRENT EXHIBITS

Salvador Dalí: An Early Surrealist Masterpiece
Through June 19
The 1930s were one of the most creatively fruitful decades of Salvador Dalí’s career. L’homme poisson (The Fish Man) shows both his tremendous imagination as well as his technical adroitness, and offers a revealing glimpse into the artist’s inner psyche. After an auspicious beginning as part of the first exhibition of surrealist works held in the U.S., in 1931, the painting has remained out of the public domain for much of its existence. This exhibition celebrates the Meadows’ acquisition of L’homme poisson-the first painting by Dalí to enter the collection of a Texas museum-and presents a renewed look at this early masterpiece within the artist’s oeuvre of surrealism. Learn More
This exhibition has been organized by the Meadows Museum, and is funded by a generous gift from The Meadows Foundation.

Between Paris and Texas: Marie Cronin, Portraitist of the Belle Époque
February 14 – June 5
Between Paris and Texas: Marie Cronin, Portraitist of the Belle Époque is the first monographic exhibition of Cronin’s (1867-1951) art and will feature a focused selection of her paintings, including works shown in the salons of Paris, as well as official portraits of Texas statesmen that hang at the Texas State Capitol, such as Alfonso Steele (1817-1911), the last survivor of the Battle of San Jacinto. A Texas-raised artist, Cronin studied with Claudio Castelucho (Spanish, 1870-1927) in Paris during the first decade of the twentieth century. Following her return from Europe, Cronin would continue her artistic career back in Texas while also carrying out the exigencies of a family in the business of expanding railroad operations across the state. Learn More
This exhibition has been organized by the Meadows Museum, and is funded by a generous gift from The Meadows Foundation.

Process and Innovation: Carlotta Corpron and Janet Turner
February 14 – June 5
This exhibition will present the work of two pioneering artists working and teaching in Texas in the 1940s and 1950s, Carlotta Corpron (1901-1988) and Janet Turner (1914-1988). Corpron, working in photography, and Turner, working in painting and printmaking, both taught art education at Texas universities and came into their own maturity of style during the middle of the twentieth century. Process and Innovation: Carlotta Corpron and Janet Turner explores the work of both artists made during this period of consummate experimentation. This exhibition draws entirely from holdings within the Dallas area, including Bywaters Special Collections of SMU, which holds an impressive collection of art by both Turner and Corpron. Learn More
This exhibition has been organized by the Meadows Museum, and is funded by a generous gift from The Meadows Foundation.


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Alba Collection Symposium Dec. 4

alba symposium

Alba Collection Symposium Dec. 4

Join us for a public symposium at the Meadows Museum that will bring together established and emerging scholars for discussion and debate on a selection of masterpieces from the collection of the Alba family.
The morning session will be devoted to three keynote lectures that will narrate a story of the life and afterlife of the Alba collection, and raise broader questions about parallel collections throughout Europe. The first lecture will examine the dispersal of the Alba collection in the nineteenth century, the second will investigate the political appropriation of the collection during the Spanish Civil War, and the third will address conservation issues pertaining to specific objects. The afternoon session will take place in the exhibition galleries, where eight speakers will present “object biographies,” unfolding the stories of individual works on view in the exhibition. A break for lunch will follow the morning session, and the symposium will close with a reception for attendees.
This symposium is co-organized by the Meadows Museum and the Edith O’Donnell Institute of Art History at The University of Texas at Dallas.

Morning Session – Bob and Jean Smith Auditorium


9:00 – 9:30 a.m. 

Coffee and informal viewing of the exhibition

Treasures from the House of Alba: 500 Years of Art and Collecting

9:30 – 9:40 a.m. – OPENING REMARKS
Mark Roglán (Linda P. and William A. Custard Director of the Meadows Museum and Centennial Chair in the Meadows School of the Arts, SMU)
Richard Brettell (Director, Edith O’Donnell Institute of Art History, UTD)
9:40 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.LECTURES
9:40 – 10:20 a.m.
Richard Brettell (O’Donnell Institute, UTD)
The Alba Collection Paris Sale: Spanish Art, Tapestries, and French Taste in the early Third Republic
10:25 – 11:05 a.m.
Miriam Basilio (Assoc. Professor of Art History and Museum Studies, New York University)
“Museums for the People”: The Alba Collection and Debates about Cultural Property during the Spanish Civil War
11:10 a.m. – 11:50 p.m.
Rafael Alonso (Conservator, Museo Nacional del Prado, Madrid)
Preserving the Legacy of the House of Alba in the Twentieth Century

12:00 – 1:30 p.m.
Break for Lunch and informal viewing of the exhibition Treasures from the House of Alba: 500 Years of Art and Collecting


Afternoon Session – Jake and Nancy Hamon Galleries

1:30 – 3:10 p.m. – OBJECT BIOGRAPHIES 
1:30 – 1:50 p.m.
Shira Lander (Professor of Practice & Director of Jewish Studies, SMU)
Rabbi Mosé Arrajel and School of Toledo, Alba Family Bible, 1430
1:55 – 2:15 p.m.
Lori Diel (Assoc. Professor and Coordinator of Art History, TCU)
Decree granting coat of arms to Martín Moctezuma, 1536
2:20 – 2:40 p.m.
Mark Rosen (Assoc. Professor of Aesthetic Studies, Edith O’Donnell Institute, UTD)
Fernão Vaz Dourado, Portulano, Atlas of the World, 1568
2:45 – 3:05 p.m.
Lisa Pon (Assoc. Professor of Art History, SMU)
Willem de Pannemaker, Mercury in Love with Herse, 1570
3:10 – 3:30 p.m.BREAK AND INFORMAL DISCUSSION
3:30 – 5:10 p.m.OBJECT BIOGRAPHIES, PART II
3:30 – 3:50 p.m.
Nicole Atzbach (Curator, Meadows Museum, SMU)
Andrea Vaccaro, Penitent Magdalene, c. 1650-60
3:55 – 4:15 p.m.
Amy Freund (Asst. Professor & The Kleinheinz Family Endowment for the Arts & Education Endowed Chair in Art History, SMU)
Louis Michel van Loo, The Children of the Second Duke of Berwick, c. 1715
4:20 – 4:40 p.m.
Xavier Salomon (Peter Jay Sharp Chief Curator, Frick Collection, New York)
Francisco de Goya, The Duchess of Alba in White, 1795
4:455:05 p.m.
Mark Roglán (Meadows Museum, SMU)
Josep María Sert, Victory Comes Slowly; Defeat of the Enemy; The Book of History; Mobilization, c. 1918
5:106:00 p.m.
Reception for symposium attendees at the Meadows Museum
FREE!

Seating is first come, first served;
no reservations required.

Symposium concludes with a reception

Questions? Contact Carmen Smith at either

 

 

Permanent link to this article: http://artgroupsdfw.com/exhibits-events/alba-collection-symposium-dec-4/

Meadows Museum’s 2015 Moss/Chumley North Texas Artist Award deadline Nov. 11

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Meadows Museum Accepting Applications for

2015 Moss/Chumley North Texas Artist Award

 

DALLAS (SMU), October 12, 2015 – The Meadows Museum at SMU is accepting applications through November 11, 2015 from area artists for the Moss/Chumley North Texas Artist Award. The award is given annually to an outstanding North Texas artist who has exhibited professionally for at least ten years and who has a proven track record as an active community advocate for the visual arts. The cash prize for the award is $2,500.  The competition is accepting entries in the genres of drawing, painting, sculpture, assemblage, construction, video, photography, performance, and installation. To be eligible, an artist must reside in one of the following North Texas counties: Collin, Dallas, Denton, Ellis, Hunt, Johnson, Kaufman, Parker, Rockwall, Tarrant or Wise. To enter, visit: http://www.meadowsmuseumdallas.org/docs/MossChumley2015-6ApplicationForm.pdf  to download an application.  For questions, contact Nicole Atzbach (214-768-4490; natzbach@smu.edu) or Shelley DeMaria (214-768-4246; sdemaria@smu.edu).

The following individuals have been named to the jury for the 2015 award:

  • Willie Baronet, artist and Stan Richards Professor in Creative Advertising, SMU
  • Joan Davidow, director emerita, Dallas Contemporary
  • Heyd Fontenot, artist and director of Central Trak
  • Stephen Lapthisophon, multimedia artist and professor of art and art history at UT Dallas and UT Arlington
  • Shelley DeMaria, curatorial assistant, Meadows Museum, SMU
  • David Leggett, photographer and membership manager, Meadows Museum, SMU
  • Nicole Atzbach, curator, Meadows Museum, SMU

The Moss/Chumley Memorial Fund was begun in 1989 by Frank Moss and the Meadows Museum as a tribute to Jim Chumley; Moss’s name was added to the fund upon his death in 1991. Moss and Chumley were two Dallas art dealers who made outstanding contributions to the visual arts in North Texas during the 1980s. The pair operated the Nimbus Gallery on Routh Street from 1980 to 1987 and the Moss/Chumley Gallery at the Crescent Court from 1986 to 1989, where they showcased numerous new artists. Established in 1995, the Moss/Chumley North Texas Artist Award is given in their memory.

The winner will be announced at a private museum event on December 9, 2015.

 

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About the Meadows Museum

The Meadows Museum is the leading U.S. institution focused on the study and presentation of the art of Spain. In 1962, Dallas businessman and philanthropist Algur H. Meadows donated his private collection of Spanish paintings, as well as funds to start a museum, to Southern Methodist University. The Museum opened to the public in 1965, marking the first step in fulfilling Meadows’ vision to create a “Prado on the Prairie.” Today, the Meadows is home to one of the largest and most comprehensive collections of Spanish art outside of Spain. The collection spans from the 10th to the 21st century and includes medieval objects, Renaissance and Baroque sculptures, and major paintings by Golden Age and modern masters. Since 2010 the Museum has been engaged in a multidimensional partnership with the Prado, which has included the exchange of scholarship, exhibitions, works of art, and other resources. The Meadows Museum is celebrating its 50th Anniversary in 2015 with a series of special exhibitions and programs. Visit http://www.meadowsmuseumdallas.org for more information.

 

Media Contacts:

Laurey Peat                                                                 Carrie Hunnicutt

Laurey Peat + Associates                                             Meadows Museum

lpeat@lpapr.com                                                         chunnicutt@smu.edu

214-871-8787                                                             214-768-1584

Carrie Hunnicutt

Marketing & PR Manager

Meadows Museum

214-768-1584

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Coming Up at SMU Meadows

ThisWeekAtSMUMeadows

MEADOWS MUSEUM EXHIBIT
INFANTA MARGARITA IN A BLUE DRESS
Through Nov. 1
» Read More

HAMON ARTS LIBRARY EXHIBIT OPENING
PAPER DOLLS
Wednesday, Sept. 9
» Read More

 

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MEADOWS MUSEUM EXHIBIT OPENING
TREASURES FROM THE HOUSE OF ALBA
Friday, Sept. 11
» Read More

POLLOCK GALLERY EXHIBIT – OPENING RECEPTION
A TO Z: ABRACADABRA TO ZOMBIES
Saturday, Sept. 12 at 6:00 p.m.
» Read More

MUSEUM WORKSHOP
DRAWING FROM THE MASTERS
Sunday, Sept. 13 at 1:30 p.m.
» Read More

 

POLLOCK GALLERY LECTURE
FROM “MAN AND HIS WORLD” TO THE END OF THE WORLD BY MICHAEL A. MORRIS
Tuesday, Sept. 15 at 7:00 p.m.
» Read More

 

» SMU Now Accepting Applications for the Master of Management in International Arts Management

» Arts Leaders in the Making: Two M.A./M.B.A. Students Receive Business Council for the Arts Fellowships

» What Can You Do with an Art History Degree?

» Alessio Bax and Lucille Chung Named Johnson-Prothro Artists-in-Residence at SMU Meadows School of the Arts

 

–from This Week at SMU Meadows newsletter

Permanent link to this article: http://artgroupsdfw.com/exhibits-events/coming-up-at-smu-meadows/