Frida Kahlo-inspired exhibition at the Bath House


Frida Kahlo: La Flor de la Vida (The Flower of Life)

December 5, 2015-January 30, 2016

Reception with the Artists:
Saturday, December 5, 2015
(7-9 PM)Over sixty years after her death, Mexican painter Frida Kahlo continues to garner praise and devoted loyalty from an ever-growing legion of admirers all over the world. As iconic as her artwork, the story of the artist’s life has inspired many artists of all disciplines to create works that reflect on the transcendental and influential views, ideas, and fortitude of the artist, as well as her approach to life and art-making.

Alexa Mason
Alexa Mason

The curators of this exhibition, Jacque Forsher and Jose Vargas, selected works of art in a variety of media that were created by over 50 local and regional artists who drew inspiration from the life and art of this highly celebrated and enigmatic artist.

This exhibition pays tribute to an extraordinarily complex and talented artist who has gained a massive number of devoted supporters not only in the community of artists and art lovers, but also in a segment of society that is receptive to her views on gender equality, politics, cultural pride, and firmness of mind and purpose in the face of personal uncertainty and devastation.

The artists featured in this show are: Thomas Alonso, Chandra Armstead, Robin Bachtler Cushman, Rita Barnard, Sal Barron, Ninotchka Beavers, Vicki Charlotta, Silvia R. Chavez, Steve Danner, Katrina Doran, Dan Dudley , Lori Dudley, Brett Dyer, Jacque Forsher, Johnathon C. Foster, Lorie Gamez, Genie Geer, Angel Gonzales, Linda Goodwin, Cynthia Green, Rebecca Guy, Juan J. Hernandez, Duke Horn, Sherry Houpt, Luis Hurtado, Laura Irrgang, Cindy Kelley, Joanna Lagrone-Headrick, Laurie Mahoney, Jorge Martinez, Alexa Mason, Cyndi McDonnell, Tina Medina, Chuck Miller, Deb Miller, Margo Miller, Vincent Morin Jr., Rebeca Navarro, Sharon Neel-Bagley, Kristen Penrod, Christina Ramirez, Gabriel Ramirez, Liliana Ramirez, Janet Reynolds, Ellen Rhodes Moore, Juliet Rivera-Schwabe, Alfredo Rodriguez, Ann Rowley, Dulce Ruque, Cindy Seely, Eugene Soliz, Diane Torres, Jose Vargas, and Sidney Wilson.

Frida Kahlo: La Flor de la Vida (The Flower of Life)
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Kahlo Fashion – You are invited to dress up as Frida
Ann Rowley
Ann Rowley

Yes, we loved seeing our patrons at our last gallery reception putting on their costumes and makeup to be transformed into the very stylish Day of the Dead Catrinas back in October.

But, can you really think of Frida Kahlo and not think about her remarkably fashionable look, too? Catrina met her true match when Frida arrived at the art scene wearing her wonderful attire.

Even Frida’s husband, Diego Rivera, couldn’t resist painting Frida and Catrina together, as seen in his mural:

We certainly loved Catrinas, and we would also love Fridas in the gallery on opening night. We encourage you to find a colorful dress, a shawl, some hair decorations, and maybe a spider monkey (preferably a fake one) to dress up like the Mexican painter. And because Frida would have disapproved if we discriminated against men, we also encourage our patrons to dress up as Diego Rivera.

Most of all, have fun!

Post: Recent artwork by Shawn Saumell
Shawn Saumell

Shawn Saumell

Through January 30, 2016

Presented at the White Rock Lake Museum, located inside the Bath House Cultural Center.

Shawn Saumell is a visual artist born in New York who currently lives and works in Dallas. When the artist was first asked to develop a new exhibition, he considered the mission of the White Rock Lake Museum of bringing the preservation of the environment to the forefront of public discussion. The artist’s new show,Post, is an important project that echoes some of the ideas and concepts of ecological conservation that are regularly presented in the museum.

Post features a series of prints mounted on aluminum panels that depict colorful, yet desolated and otherworldly desertscapes. Within some of the artist’s imagined environments, he includes abandoned metal buildings and other structures that might represent societies or cultures perhaps long-gone. These landscapes could symbolize Earth or other planets whose civilizations may have made similar self-destructive choices to their environment. The title of the exhibition refers to the co-relation of Mr. Saumell’s invented spaces with views and thoughts about post-war, post-natural disaster, post-nuclear winter, post-apocalyptical world, post-Earth civilization, and other similar concepts.

More information about the artist can be found at


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Bath House Cultural Center • (214)

The Bath House Cultural Center is a division of the City of Dallas Office of Cultural Affairs. The center is dedicated to fostering the growth, development and quality of multi-cultural arts within the City of Dallas. The center emphasizes innovating visual and performing arts as well as other multi-discipline events throughout the year. Funding for the Bath House Cultural Center is provided by the City of Dallas, with additional support from the Texas Commission on the Arts.


The Bath House Cultural Center is located on the eastern shore of White Rock Lake at the end of Northcliff Dr. off of Buckner Blvd. at 521 E. Lawther, Dallas, TX 75218. Hours of operation are Tuesday-Saturday, 12:00 noon to 6:00 PM. The center is open until 10:00 PM on nights with theatre performances. For general information about cultural programs at the Bath House Cultural Center, please call (214) 670-8749 or visit the center’s website at


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